Find • PRG 1373 • Results 121 to 150 of 2,878

The 'Hesperus' at anchor

The 'Hesperus' at anchor

The iron ship, 'Hesperus', 1777 tons, at anchor [iron ship, 1859 gross tons. ON68500, 262.2 x 39.7 x 23.5. Built 1873 (11) R Steele and Co. Greenock. Owners: J Anderson (Anderson,Anderson and Co.) registered London, sold 1890 to Devitt and Moore, sold in 1899 she became the Russian 'Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna' then British again as 'Silvana' and under that name was broken up at Genoa in the 1920s. As an Orient Line vessel she remained in the Adelaide trade almost without a break until sale in 1890 put her into the eastern coast trade as a training ship for cadets under Lord Brassey's scheme. After sale to the Russians she remained a training ship up to the time of the outbreak of WW1. In the Adelaide run she was always a favourite passenger ship and although not noted for speed was regarded as very comfortable and regular].

The 'Invercauld' at Port Adelaide

The 'Invercauld' at Port Adelaide

The wooden barque 'Invercauld', 1247 tons, at Port Adelaide [wooden ship, 1320 gross tons, 1247 net tons, ON70437, 222.6 x 36.9 x 21.3. Built 1874 (9) Humphrey, Aberdeen. Owners: 1882 = Aitken and Co. registered Aberdeen, by 1885 sold to renamed 'Orion' by owners in Arendal] This illustration to be re0checked. It is likely that the vessel is a barque of similar size owned by other Aberdeen owners and constructed in 1891.

The 'Glen Osmond' in unidentified port

The 'Glen Osmond' in unidentified port

The composite ship 'Glen Osmond', 776 tons, in unidentified port [composite barque, 776 gross tons, later 780 tons. ON56864, 172.3 x 33.5 x 18.0. Built 1867 (8) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners W Stevens, registered London, later WG Elder, registered London, and sometimes owned by AL Elder. Renamed 'Zora' owned by M Ivetta, of Ragusa, Austria-Hungary. Wrecked at Spykerplaat 7 Dec. 1895 on a voyage from Antwerp towards Buenos Aires. Popular passenger vessel in the Adelaide trade in her early days. Fate as yet unlocated. Drops from Lloyds c.1890].

The 'Collingrove' at Port Adelaide

The 'Collingrove' at Port Adelaide

The composite barque 'Collingrove', 861 tons, at Port Adelaide. [composite ship reduced to a barque c.1890. 861 gross tons. ON60990. 181.4 x 33.5 x 19.6. Built 1869 (7). J. Laing, Sunderland. Owners W. Stevens, registered London early 1870s to AL Elder and Co. About 1900 sold to owners in Shanghai. A regular visitor to Port Adelaide from the time she was built until the late 1890's.]

The 'Collingrove' at Port Adelaide

The 'Collingrove' at Port Adelaide

The composite barque 'Collingrove', 861 tons, at Port Adelaide. [composite ship reduced to a barque c.1890. 861 gross tons. ON60990. 181.4 x 33.5 x 19.6. Built 1869 (7). J. Laing, Sunderland. Owners W. Stevens, registered London early 1870s to AL Elder and Co. About 1900 sold to owners in Shanghai. A regular visitor to Port Adelaide from the time she was built until the late 1890's.]

The 'Collingrove' at Port Adelaide

The 'Collingrove' at Port Adelaide

The composite barque 'Collingrove', 861 tons, at Port Adelaide. [composite ship reduced to a barque c.1890. 861 gross tons. ON60990. 181.4 x 33.5 x 19.6. Built 1869 (7). J. Laing, Sunderland. Owners W. Stevens, registered London early 1870s to AL Elder and Co. About 1900 sold to owners in Shanghai. A regular visitor to Port Adelaide from the time she was built until the late 1890's.]

The 'Beltana' on Fletcher's Slip

The 'Beltana' on Fletcher's Slip

The composite ship 'Beltana', 934 tons, on Fletcher's Slip. [Composite ship, 734 tons. ON60951 172.5 x 33.6 x 19.2. Built 1869 (4) J. Laing. Sunderland. Owners W Stevens registered London early 1870's to AL Elder and Co. Built for the South Australian trade, as her name implies, she was acquired by Elder in the first years of her life and gained some unwelcome publicity when her captain, Richard Angel, got her ashore on Kangaroo Island, 20 August 1871 on his way to load wool at Port Augusta. Having successfully refloated the vessel he did not report it. Having completed loading he set out for England, but commenced leaking so badly that he had to take the ship into Port Adelaide for repairs (photo shows her on the slip being repaired). As a result he was dismissed his ship. Ordered to load wool at Lyttelton, NZ in 1874 the ship caught fire and was badly burnt but was repaired and resumed trading. Colonial Clippers: 130 et. seq. SA Register 5 Dec 1871. Aust. Ency. 1926 (Wrecks, cas. etc)].

The 'Beltana' at Port Adelaide

The 'Beltana' at Port Adelaide

The barque 'Beltana', 934 tons, at Port Adelaide. [Composite ship, 734 tons. ON60951 172.5 x 33.6 x 19.2. Built 1869 (4) J. Laing. Sunderland. Owners W Stevens registered London early 1870's to AL Elder and Co. Built for the South Australian trade, as her name implies, she was acquired by Elder in the first years of her life and gained some unwelcome publicity when her captain, Richard Angel, got her ashore on Kangaroo Island, 20 August 1871 on his way to load wool at Port Augusta. Having successfully refloated the vessel he did not report it. Having completed loading he set out for England, but commenced leaking so badly that he had to take the ship into Port Adelaide for repairs (photo shows her on the slip being repaired). As a result he was dismissed his ship. Ordered to load wool at Lyttelton, NZ in 1874 the ship caught fire and was badly burnt but was repaired and resumed trading. Colonial Clippers: 130 et. seq. SA Register 5 Dec 1871. Aust. Ency. 1926 (Wrecks, cas. etc)].

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide.

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide.

The 'Torrens' in New Dock, Port Adelaide

The 'Torrens' in New Dock, Port Adelaide

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, in the new dock at Port Adelaide.

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide. This is the earliest photograph of the 'Torrens'.

The 'Torrens' in the Southern Ocean

The 'Torrens' in the Southern Ocean

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, becalmed in the Southern Ocean.

The 'Torrens' in Port Adelaide after striking an iceberg

The 'Torrens' in Port Adelaide after striking an iceberg

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London. Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. The long term part-owner and first master of the Torrens was Captain Henry Robert Angel, who commanded the Torrens from 1875-1890. Next skipper was Captain W.H. Cope, (1890-1896). Captain Henry Robert Angel's son, Falkland Angel commanded the Torrens from 1896 until she was sold to Italian owners in 1906. Torrens' last voyage from Port Adelaide was 1903. Captain Sydney Angel was a nephew of Captain Henry Robert Angel who was the part owner and first commander of the Torrens. Sydney Angel was the son of Captain Richard Angel, who commanded the Beltana, also for the Elder Line. Sydney Angel served his early sea years on the Torrens, but he was never her master or owner. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide after striking an iceburg.

The 'Torrens' in Port Adelaide with crew

The 'Torrens' in Port Adelaide with crew

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide after striking an iceburg in the Southern Ocean on 11th January 1899.

The 'Torrens' undergoing repair in Fletcher's Slip

The 'Torrens' undergoing repair in Fletcher's Slip

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, undergoing repairs on Fletcher's Slip, Port Adelaide. She returned to England, with a straight stem, where a new bow was fitted.

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide with new bow and spike bowsprit

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide with new bow and spike bowsprit

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens'].

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide with new bow, figurehead and spike bowsprit

The 'Torrens' at Port Adelaide with new bow, figurehead and spike bowsprit

The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1335 gross tons, 1276 net tons. ON73595. 222.1 x 38.1 x 21.5. Built 1875 (10) J Laing, Sunderland. Owners: AL Elder and others, registered London (the others included her long time master, Captain SH Angel, not the one associated with 'Beltana'). Sold 1903 to Italian owners, and broken up in 1910. With the exception of the 'Loch' ships the last sailing ship to regularly carry passengers in the Australian-England trade. A very lengthy and comprehensive item in 'Colonial Clippers' gives an outline history. See pages 132 onwards. The damage caused by an iceberg, shown in some of the illustrations demonstrates the immense strength of the vessel. There are innumerable references to this vessel in books, newspaper cuttings etc. as she was a favourite passenger ship with a long career. Latter day writers frequently have called her 'The Wonderful Torrens']. The composite ship 'Torrens', 1276 tons, at Port Adelaide after receiving a new bow, figurehead and spike bowsprit.

The 'Grasmere' under tow

The 'Grasmere' under tow

The iron barque 'Grasmere', 1304 tons, under tow [steam tug Defiance, wooden ss, 64 gross tons. ON83635. 83.0 x 18.0 x 7.2 (after 1905 49 gross tons) Built 1881 (7) Rock Davis, Blackwall, Brisbane Water NSW. Owners (acquired from Sydney March 1889) WR Cave, registered Port Adelaide, March 1889, The Adelaide Steam Tug Co. Ltd. Vessel broken up in 1930. Further background see Steam Tugs in South Australia by Parsons, 1972] [Grasmere = iron ship, 1364 gross ton, ON74488, 226.0 x 36.1 x 22.1. Built 1875 (12) Whitehaven, SB Co. Whitehaven. Owners: Fisher and Sprott, registered Liverpool. By the mid 1880s had been rigged down to a barque, and by 1910 had been sold to Norwegians who retained the same name. Although said to have been employed regularly in the Australian trade for many years apart from three trips to New Zealand (in 1883, 1885, and 1887 each time under charter to the New Zealand Shipping Company), information of her activities in Australia has proved difficult to locate. 'Last of the Windjammers' Vol. 1 p.168 and 170 notes some brief detail. (In which he draws a wrong conclusion, saying that her lengthy trips were a result of being rigged as a barque, against similar ships being rigged as a ship. The longest elapsed time for the trip was when she was rigged as a ship, her quicker times being after she was rigged down)].

The 'Combermere' at Port Chalmers, New Zealand

The 'Combermere' at Port Chalmers, New Zealand

The iron ship 'Combermere', 1727 tons, at Port Chalmers, New Zealand. [iron ship, 1727 tons, ON84113, 251.3 x 39.0 x 24.0. Built 1881 (5). Richardson, Duck and Co. Stockton. Owners CW Kellock and Co. Registered Liverpool, later J Edgar and Co. registered Liverpool, passed to Italian owners in first decade 20th century without change of name.] [Note from R Parsons - Although included in the Mere Line I find no evidence of ever having been owned or chartered by that firm. Presumably in error due to the similarity of nomenclature] Various fleeting references to this vessel in both volumes of The Last of the Windjammers by Lubbock. However nothing of particular interest.

The 'Combermere' docked portside

The 'Combermere' docked portside

The iron ship 'Combermere', 1727 tons, docked on her portside. [iron ship, 1727 tons, ON84113, 251.3 x 39.0 x 24.0. Built 1881 (5). Richardson, Duck and Co. Stockton. Owners CW Kellock and Co. Registered Liverpool, later J Edgar and Co. registered Liverpool, passed to Italian owners in first decade 20th century without change of name.] [Note from R Parsons - Although included in the Mere Line I find no evidence of ever having been owned or chartered by that firm. Presumably in error due to the similarity of nomenclature] Various fleeting references to this vessel in both volumes of The Last of the Windjammers by Lubbock. However nothing of particular interest.

The 'Buttermere' in an unidentified port

The 'Buttermere' in an unidentified port

The iron barque 'Buttermere', 1021 tons, in an unidentified port. [iron barque, 1021 gross tons. ON76414, 214.0 x 34.4 x 20.2. Built 1877(1) Whitehaven, SB Co. Whitehaven. Owners Fisher and Sprott, reg. Liverpool later renamed Freia by Norwegian owners and then Pax Danish. Apart from a visit to Wellington NZ in 1880, I cannot locate any reference to the activities of this vessel in Australian waters. Sold out of English ownership in the early 1890's. - note by Parsons] Square Riggers, The Fi nal Epoch, by Hurst (Teredo Books) nd.

The 'Thirlmere' anchored

The 'Thirlmere' anchored

The iron ship 'Thirlmere', 1777 tons, anchored near a hilly shoreline [iron ship, 1777 gross tons, ON70841. 260.0 x 39.1 x 23.1. Built 1874 (1) Whitehaven SB Co. Whitehaven. Owners: Sprott and Fisher, registered Liverpool, later W Lowden and Co.. See 'Last of the Windjammers' by Lubbock]. A researcher has suggested that the location may be San Francisco, and that the Captain of the 'Thirlmere' was Captain Brown.

The 'Thirlmere' anchored near cliffs

The 'Thirlmere' anchored near cliffs

The iron ship 'Thirlmere', 1777 tons, anchored near cliffs [iron ship, 1777 gross tons, ON70841. 260.0 x 39.1 x 23.1. Built 1874 (1) Whitehaven SB Co. Whitehaven. Owners: Sprott and Fisher, registered Liverpool, later W Lowden and Co.. See 'Last of the Windjammers' by Lubbock].

The 'Ravenswood' under sail

The 'Ravenswood' under sail

The iron barque 'Ravenswood', 1123 tons, under partial sail [iron barque, 1123 gross, ON63890, 216.2 x 35.8 x 20.6. Built 1877 (12) WH Potter and Co., Liverpool. Owners: J Sprott, registered Workington: later Fisher and Sprott; later JB Walmsley and Co.]

The 'Inglewood' in an unidentified port

The 'Inglewood' in an unidentified port

The iron barque 'Inglewood', 1077 tons, in an unidentified port [iron barque, 1077 gross tons, ON63886, 215.0 x 34.1 x 21.1. Built 1875 (7) R Williamson and Son, Harrington, Owners: John Sprott, registered Workington; later Fisher and Sprott, by mid 1890s owned by R Williams and Son, (the original builders) then shortly after becomes Norwegian property without a change of name. Made one passage to Auckland, arriving in command of Captain J Brocklebank, 26 December 1879 with 38 passengers. See also letter filed with 'Mallsgate'. The 'Inglewood' was reputedly a sister ship of the 'Mallsgate' and 'Geltwood', and was owned initially by Fisher & Sprott of Liverpool and registered at Workington, UK. The vessel was sold back to her builders in 1889 and was managed by R.'Williamson & Son of Workington until 1899. From 1891 to 1896, she was under the command of Captain W.F. Bunn. As with many of the large iron sailing ships, she was sold to Norwegian owners. In 1900 the 'Inglewood' was registered at Laurvig (Larvik), Norway, owned by C.H.Neilson. On the 28th March 1908 the 'Inglewood' exploded in Mandal Harbour, killing her whole crew of 14. She was bound from New York to Stockholm with a naphtha cargo (see 'Blengfell for a similar accident'). Statistics: built 1875; 1077 gross tons; 215 feet long; 34.1 feet wide; 21.1 feet deep; 3 masts].

The 'Inglewood' in an unidentified port

The 'Inglewood' in an unidentified port

The iron barque 'Inglewood', 1077 tons, in an unidentified port. The 'Inglewood' was reputedly a sister ship of the 'Mallsgate' and 'Geltwood', and was owned initially by Fisher & Sprott of Liverpool and registered at Workington, UK. The vessel was sold back to her builders in 1889 and was managed by R.'Williamson & Son of Workington until 1899. From 1891 to 1896, she was under the command of Captain W.F. Bunn. As with many of the large iron sailing ships, she was sold to Norwegian owners. In 1900 the 'Inglewood' was registered at Laurvig (Larvik), Norway, owned by C.H.Neilson. On the 28th March 1908 the 'Inglewood' exploded in Mandal Harbour, killing her whole crew of 14. She was bound from New York to Stockholm with a naphtha cargo (see 'Blengfell for a similar accident'). Statistics: built 1875; 1077 gross tons; 215 feet long; 34.1 feet wide; 21.1 feet deep; 3 masts [iron barque, 1077 gross tons, ON63886, 215.0 x 34.1 x 21.1. Built 1875 (7) R Williamson and Son, Harrington, Owners: John Sprott, registered Workington; later Fisher and Sprott, by mid 1890s owned by R Williams and Son, (the original builders) then shortly after becomes Norwegian property without a change of name. Made one passage to Auckland, arriving in command of Captain J Brocklebank, 26 December 1879 with 38 passengers. See also letter filed with 'Mallsgate'].

The 'Mallsgate' at Port Adelaide

The 'Mallsgate' at Port Adelaide

The iron barque 'Mallsgate', 1073 tons, in an unidentified port [iron barque, 1073 gross tons. ON63889, 215.3 x 34.1 x 21.0. Built 1877 (5) R Williamson and Son, Harrington. Owners: John Sprott, registered Workington, later Fisher and Sprott. Wrecked on Middleton Reef, off the coast of Australia, 21 July 1889. Thought to have been designed by Captain James sprott, longtime master of the vessel and brother of the first owners, however this is quoted by Lubbock without supporting references. He also makes a series of other statements such as that the vessel was built regardless of cost; was the finest iron barque rigged ship built; carried little cargo, all apparently unsupported. She was wrecked when laden with coal and bound from Newcastle, NSW to San Francisco. 'Last of the Windjammers' Vol. 11 gives a lengthy report on the escape and open boat voyage of the crew].

The 'Mallsgate' docked alongside a seawall

The 'Mallsgate' docked alongside a seawall

The iron barque 'Mallsgate', 1073 tons, docked alongside a seawall [iron barque, 1073 gross tons. ON63889, 215.3 x 34.1 x 21.0. Built 1877 (5) R Williamson and Son, Harrington. Owners: John Sprott, registered Workington, later Fisher and Sprott. Wrecked on Middleton Reef, off the coast of Australia, 21 July 1889. Thought to have been designed by Captain James sprott, longtime master of the vessel and brother of the first owners, however this is quoted by Lubbock without supporting references. He also makes a series of other statements such as that the vessel was built regardless of cost; was the finest iron barque rigged ship built; carried little cargo, all apparently unsupported. She was wrecked when laden with coal and bound from Newcastle, NSW to San Francisco. 'Last of the Windjammers' Vol. 11 gives a lengthy report on the escape and open boat voyage of the crew].

The 'Rydalmere' in an unidentified port

The 'Rydalmere' in an unidentified port

The iron ship, 'Rydalmere', 1246 tons, in an unidentified port [iron ship, later barque, 1312 gross tons,ON70908. 236.0 x 36.1 x 22.1 Built 1875 (2) Whitehaven SB Co., Whitehaven, owners: Joseph Sprott, registered Liverpool, later Fisher and Sprott. Rigged down to a barque in the mid 1880s. Later owned by Lowden and Co.]