Find • PRG 1373 • Results 91 to 120 of 2,878

The 'Lord Cairns' in an unidentified port

The 'Lord Cairns' in an unidentified port

The iron barque 'Lord Cairns', 1373 tons, in an unidentified port [iron ship, 1372 tons. ON78101. 230.0 x 36.0 x 22.2. Built 1877 (5) Harland and Wolff, Belfast. Owners: Hughes and Co., registered Liverpool. c.1900 became 'Spica' owned in Italy. (Note from Ron Parsons: caption says iron barque. May be confusion here. The iron barque then renamed 'Spica' was not formerly 'Lord Cairns'. 'Lord Cairns' always shown as a ship under both names. Illustration is not of ship described on sheet 'Lord Cairns'. It is of a barque which may have been the 'Lord Cairns' owned by others)].

The 'Primera' in New Dock, Port Adelaide

The 'Primera' in New Dock, Port Adelaide

The iron barque 'Primera', 597 tons, in New Dock, Port Adelaide [iron barque, 619 tons, ON74484, 173.7 x 28.6 x 17.5. Built 1875 (11) A Stephen and Sons, Glasgow. Owners: William Sherwen and Co., registered Liverpool. Note from Ron Parsons "I find no reference to this vessel being owned by Lowden and Co.] [also at 1373/21/34].

The 'Kineardineshire' anchored in an unidentified harbour

The 'Kineardineshire' anchored in an unidentified harbour

The iron barque 'Kineardineshire', 1282 tons, anchored in an unidentified harbour[error in name of ship, 'Kincardineshire' = iron barque, 1373 tons. ON87688, 237.9 x 36.0 x 21.0. Built 1883 (6) Russell and Co. Greenock. Owners: T Law and Co. Registered Glasgow. Foundered March 8, 1887].

Ships at Port Lincoln

Ships at Port Lincoln

Ships at anchor l-r: M.V. Moonta; 4 masted barque Pomman; barque Penang; 4 masted barque L'Avenir and 4 masted barque Olivebank. 2 February 1936 [duplicate copies at PRG 1373/39/11 & PRG 458/1/1/98].

The 'Mermerus' at Port Adelaide

The 'Mermerus' at Port Adelaide

The iron ship 'Mermerus', 1671 tons, at Port Adelaide. Also refer to the print PRG 1371/11/26 [iron ship, 1750 tons, ON67904. 264.2 x 39.8 x 23.7. Built 1872 (5) Barclay, Curle and Co. Glasgow. Owners: A & J Carmichael and Co., Golden Fleece Line, registered Glasgow. 1898 sold to Russian owners. Wrecked 29 Nov 1909 outward for Melbourne with timber in a heavy fog near Christiansand, refloated but not found worth repairing and broken up in 1910. One of the best known clippers in the Australian wool trade. Lubbock gives considerable attention to the ship, including original sail plan].

The 'Edinburgh Castle' wrecked near Warrnambool

The 'Edinburgh Castle' wrecked near Warrnambool

The iron barque 'Edinburgh Castle', 627 tons, wrecked near Warrnambool. Also refer to the print PRG 1317/21/75 [iron 3 mast barque 627 gross tons. ON45971. 185.5 x 29.3 x 18.7. Built 1863 (5) JG Lawrie, Glasgow. Owners T Skinner and Co. registered Glasgow. Wrecked at Warrnambool Victoria January 15, 1888 when she struck while entering in charge of a pilot. Efforts to save the vessel proved useless. She was inward with a cargo of cement for the new breakwater].

Shipping at Port Wakefield, South Australia

Shipping at Port Wakefield, South Australia

Small sailing vessels at Port Wakefield wharf.

Ketches loading grain at Port Wakefield about 1912

Ketches loading grain at Port Wakefield about 1912

Ketches loading grain at Port Wakefield about 1912.

View of Port Adelaide

View of Port Adelaide

View of Port Adelaide and the sailing ship "Monarch". This is possibly the iron barque "Monarch", 1274 tons, built in 1875 and wrecked in 1903. See PRG 1373/12/23

"Illawarra"

"Illawarra"

The ship "Illawarra", at anchor in unidentified harbour (possibly in south east of South Australia). She is an iron full-rigged ship launched October 1881 from shipyard of Dobie & Co., Glasgow for Devitt & Moore, London, intended for the Australian passenger trade. See PRG 1373/4/24 for a photograph of her under sail.

The 'Arabella' loading wool at Ninety Mile Beach

The 'Arabella' loading wool at Ninety Mile Beach

The iron barque 'Arabella', 700 tons, loading wool at Ninety Mile Beach, Western Australia [iron barque, 688 gross (upon sale foreign became 700) ON62880, 177.6 x 31.0 x 17.4. Built 1876 (2). Bartram, Haswell and Co. Sunderland. Owners: TE Hick, registered Scarborough. c. 1895 Trinder Anderson and Co. Ltd. c. 1901/2 to Swedish owners without change of name. While the property of Trinder Anderson was well known in the UK-Western Australia trade. This photograph shows the stern view of the 'Arabella'] She is beached and a team of oxen are pulling wool bales to be loaded on to the ship before high tide.

The "Arthurstone"

The "Arthurstone"

The "Arthurstone" iron barque, 1288 tons. ON75195. See PRG 1373/10/7

The "Austrasia"

The "Austrasia"

The "Austrasia" later known as the "Gustav". Official Number 99403. See PRG 1373/12/26

The "Blenheim"

The "Blenheim"

The "Blenheim" formerly known as the 'Wanganui'. Official Number 76932. See PRG 1373/2/70

The "Derwent"

The "Derwent"

[General description] The "Derwent", anchored in an unknown port. She is a three masted fully rigged iron ship. See PRG 1373/4/39 for more infomation.

The "Derwent"

The "Derwent"

[General description] "The "Derwent" under sail. She is a three masted fully rigged iron ship. See PRG 1373/4/39 for more infomation on this ship.

The "Dina" Ship

The "Dina" Ship

The ship "Dina" which was formerly the "Remington". The iron ship was originally the Norwegian vessel Dina. She weighed 999 tons and was later remodelled as a barque of 1043 tons. She was built in 1877 and dropped from registers in 1910. She is pictured here at Port Adelaide in approximately 1905. See also PRG 1373/12/39

[Port Augusta September 1884]

[Port Augusta September 1884]

Port Augusta harbour on 27 September 1884 with wooden schooner 'Postboy' loading at the end of the jetty.

The 'Orient' at Port Adelaide

The 'Orient' at Port Adelaide

The 'Orient' at Port Adelaide [wooden ship, 1033 reg. tons (1183 gross), ON12981, 184.3 x 31.7 x 21.1 feet. Built 1853 Bilbe, Rotherhithe (London), registered London, and registered in the name of one or more of the partners of the firm Anderson, Anderson & Co. from time to time. Sold out of the Australian service in 1879 and ultimately became a coal hulk in Gibralter. Employed in the Crimean War as Transport No.78 and carried troops; sailed in her first trip to Australia from Plymouth 5 July 1856 bound for Adelaide. There is a list of her passage times in 'Colonial Clippers' p.125. Involved in an incident in 1862 when she took fire homeward bound when laden with 2,6000 bales of wool. While badly damaged the ship was able to reach London and was repaired].

The 'Holmsdale' at Port Augusta

The 'Holmsdale' at Port Augusta

Wooden ship 'Holmsdale', 1250 tons, at Port Augusta [wooden ship 1257 gross tons. ON 31590. 206.8 x 37.7 x 22.4. Built 1858, J Reed, Sunderland. Owners Phillips and Co. registered London. c.1872 Bilbe and Co. who placed the ship under the management of Anderson, Anderson and Co., and she operated as a unit in the Orient Line. The ship ultimately passed to the ownership of Anderson, Anderson and Co. Sold to Norwegian owners she went missing in 1897. Originally employed in the India and China trades, upon sale to Bilbe and operating as an Orient liner she commenced in the Australian trade, her usual voyages being outward to South Australia and homeward from Melbourne. There is an abstract of her homeward log in 1883 in 'Blackwall Frigates'. In 'Colonial Clippers' there is a mention of her appearance in the Australian Wool Trade in various years, without much detail and 'Blackwall Frigates' gives some additional, sketchy information.]

The 'Yatala' at Port Adelaide

The 'Yatala' at Port Adelaide

Composite ship 'Yatala', 1127 tons, at Port Adelaide [composite ship, 1227 tons, ON53737, 203.4 x 34.6 x 21.1. Built 1865 (5) Thomas Bilbe and Co., London. Owners: Anderson, Anderson and Co., (J Anderson) registered London (iron framed hull, wood planked, metal and galvanised iron bolts) Noted as a 'passenger clipper' this ship shared the honour of a 65 day passage London to Adelaide (pilot to pilot) with the 'City of Adelaide' until the 'Torrens' lowered the record. (There is a table of her time elapsed passages, p.130 'Colonial Clippers') The vessel was wrecked in 1872. She left Port Adelaide December 18, 1871 in company with 'Beltana'. 'Yatala' went ashore near Cape Gris-Nez March 27, 1872, when almost home. Her cargo was mostly saved and there was no loss of life but the ship became a total loss].

'The Murray' shortly after launch

'The Murray' shortly after launch

Wooden ship 'The Murray', 903 tons, shortly after her launch.

'The Murray' at Port Adelaide

'The Murray' at Port Adelaide

Wooden ship 'The Murray', 903 tons, at Port Adelaide [wooden ship, 903 tons, ON29788, 193.0 x 33.2 x 20.0. Built 1861 (5) Hall. Aberdeen. Owners: Anderson and Co., registered London. The last Orient liner to be built completely of wood (subsequent vessels were of composite build until the change to iron) In her early days, at least, employed in the UK-Adelaide trade. Note from Parsons: 'It is unusual to incorporate the word 'the' in the name of a ship; it often confused compilers of official records in any search of MNL, Lloyds etc,. check under 'Murray' as well as 'The Murray'].

The 'Coonatto' at Port Adelaide

The 'Coonatto' at Port Adelaide

Wooden ship 'Coonatto', 633 tons, at Port Adelaide. [Mispelt as Coonatta in album] Photographed in the South Australia Company basin, Port Adelaide, 1867. [Composite ship, 633 tons, ON47320. 160.2 x 29.0 x 18.7. Built 1863 (4) Bilbe, London. Owners Anderson, registered London. Considered to be a clipper and often in the South Australian trade. This vessel was wrecked on Beachy Head, England in 1876 (21 Feb) Spent all of her short career in the UK-Australia trades. Her best run is reputed to have been of 66 days to the Semaphore lightship.]

The 'Heather Bell' docked in Newcastle

The 'Heather Bell' docked in Newcastle

The wooden barque 'Heather Bell', 479 tons, docked in Newcastle, with the Coutts Sailor's Home in view to the furthest right. [wooden ship, later barque rigged, 472 tons, later 575 and then 479 tons (due to minor alterations and remeasurements) 155.0 x 28.5 x 17.5. Built 1855 Hall, Aberdeen. ON32005. Owners: built for Thomas Brown and Co., registered Hobart: sold to Samuel Tullock and registered Launceston: acquired in early 1870s by Anderson, Anderson and Co., and registered London (reversing a more common trend of Australian owners buying from English proprietors) returned to Australian owners at Melbourne in 1881. In October 1882 owned by George Bailey and registered Port Adelaide. In August 1888 sold to owners in Newcastle, NSW and believed to have been allowed to rot on the bank, however Lubbock states she was broken up in Sydney in 1894. Until her sale toward the end of the 1870s this vessel was regularly employed in the UK-Australian trade and initially was employed sailing to Tasmania, upon sale to Anderson she commenced to trade more frequently to Sydney and Melbourne. The ship was famous for an exceptionally fast run to England of 67 days in 1856 that was seldom bettered ('Vanished Fleets', by Villiers, page 220 gives full details and also 'Colonial Clippers' page 127 and 128. Australian owners available from AMHS on request).

The 'Heather Bell' in Port Adelaide

The 'Heather Bell' in Port Adelaide

The wooden barque 'Heather Bell', 479 tons, in Port Adelaide [wooden ship, later barque rigged, 472 tons, later 575 and then 479 tons (due to minor alterations and remeasurements) 155.0 x 28.5 x 17.5. Built 1855 Hall, Aberdeen. ON32005. Owners: built for Thomas Brown and Co., registered Hobart: sold to Samuel Tullock and registered Launceston: acquired in early 1870s by Anderson, Anderson and Co., and registered London (reversing a more common trend of Australian owners buying from English proprietors) returned to Australian owners at Melbourne in 1881. In October 1882 owned by George Bailey and registered Port Adelaide. In August 1888 sold to owners in Newcastle, NSW and believed to have been allowed to rot on the bank, however Lubbock states she was broken up in Sydney in 1894. Until her sale toward the end of the 1870s this vessel was regularly employed in the UK-Australian trade and initially was employed sailing to Tasmania, upon sale to Anderson she commenced to trade more frequently to Sydney and Melbourne. The ship was famous for an exceptionally fast run to England of 67 days in 1856 that was seldom bettered ('Vanished Fleets', by Villiers, page 220 gives full details and also 'Colonial Clippers' page 127 and 128. Australian owners available from AMHS on request).

The 'Heather Bell' in Port Adelaide

The 'Heather Bell' in Port Adelaide

The wooden barque 'Heather Bell', 479 tons, in Port Adelaide [wooden ship, later barque rigged, 472 tons, later 575 and then 479 tons (due to minor alterations and remeasurements) 155.0 x 28.5 x 17.5. Built 1855 Hall, Aberdeen. ON32005. Owners: built for Thomas Brown and Co., registered Hobart: sold to Samuel Tullock and registered Launceston: acquired in early 1870s by Anderson, Anderson and Co., and registered London (reversing a more common trend of Australian owners buying from English proprietors) returned to Australian owners at Melbourne in 1881. In October 1882 owned by George Bailey and registered Port Adelaide. In August 1888 sold to owners in Newcastle, NSW and believed to have been allowed to rot on the bank, however Lubbock states she was broken up in Sydney in 1894. Until her sale toward the end of the 1870s this vessel was regularly employed in the UK-Australian trade and initially was employed sailing to Tasmania, upon sale to Anderson she commenced to trade more frequently to Sydney and Melbourne. The ship was famous for an exceptionally fast run to England of 67 days in 1856 that was seldom bettered ('Vanished Fleets', by Villiers, page 220 gives full details and also 'Colonial Clippers' page 127 and 128. Australian owners available from AMHS on request).

The 'Orient' and 'White Eagle' in Port Adelaide

The 'Orient' and 'White Eagle' in Port Adelaide

The 'Orient' (left) and 'White Eagle' (right) at Port Adelaide ['White Eagle' = iron ship, 879 gross,ON31755, 203.3 x 32.8 x 20.9. Built 1855 A Stephens and Sons, Kelvinhaugh, Glasgow (Lubbock infers this vessel was built on the Thames, but that is not so) Owners: J MacFarlane, registered Glasgow; then c. early 1860s Robinson, registered London. About 1868 to Bilbe and Co., registered London (who placed her under the management of Anderson, Anderson - Orient Line); 1876 sold to New Zealand Shipping Co. Ltd., and registered Dunedin, New Zealand and in July 1877 renamed 'Pareora'. Under that name was broken up in 1888. At least under the management of the Orient Line was a visitor to Australian ports, and possibly prior to her acquisition by Bilbe. From the time of her sale to New Zealand Shipping Company, until renamed, she made at least one voyage to New Zealand; visiting Auckland in October 1876. See 'Colonial Clippers' by Lubbock].

The 'Pareora' moored at Port Chalmers, New Zealand.

The 'Pareora' moored at Port Chalmers, New Zealand.

The iron ship 'Pareora', 879 tons, formerly named the 'White Eagle' [from the time of her acquisition by New Zealand Shipping Co. Ltd., the ship remained in the England-NZ passenger trade. In the period she took passengers to Auckland arriving Sept. 1878 and March 1882. To Wellington arriving July 1879, July 1880, April 1881, Jan. 1883. To Lyttelton arriving Oct. 1884. To Port Chalmers arriving Oct 1877, Nov. 1883. To New Plymouth arriving Dec. 1885. Reference 'White Wings' by Henry Brett 1924].

The 'Darra' anchored in an unidentified port

The 'Darra' anchored in an unidentified port

The composite ship, 'Darra', 999 tons, anchored in an unidentified port [composite ship, 999 tons. ON52729. 190.0 x 33.5 x 21.0. Built 1865 (6) A. Hall and Co. Aberdeen. Owners Anderson, Anderson and Co. Registered London. By the end of the 1870's the vessel had been rigged down to a barque. In 1885 acquired by Trinder, Anderson and Co. (not connected with Anderson, Anderson and Co) registered Aberdeen. Throughout her life associated with the Australian trade. Under the Orient flag the Darra was more familiar with the eastern coast of Australia, while under the Trinder Anderson flag she was more prone to visit the western shores. The vessel was hulked in New Zealand, having been sold to Australian owners in 1888, and the Westport Coal Company in 1899, and very likely hulked about the same time, if not earlier].