South Australia Illustrated [B 15276] • Artwork

South Australia Illustrated

South Australia Illustrated

The attached image shows the cover from 'South Australia Illustrated', a volume featuring lithographs based on drawings by colonial artist George French Angas. It features an idealised Aboriginal family, kangaroos, emus and Australian flora with a plain in the distance.

The City of Adelaide, from the Torrens near the Reed Beds

The City of Adelaide, from the Torrens near the Reed Beds

Plate 1: the City of Adelaide, from the Torrens near the Reed Beds. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The City, as viewed from the fertile district of the Reed Beds, appears to stand on an elevated plateau, overlooking the level country towards the Gulf of St Vincent, with the Mount Lofty Ranges in the distance ...'

Grass trees at Yankallillah with the red kangaroo

Grass trees at Yankallillah with the red kangaroo

Plate 2: Grass trees at Yankallillah, with the red kangaroo (Macropus Laniger - Gould). Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'This scene represents the largest variety of the Xantharea, which is to be met with in South Australia; there are from ten to fifteen species already known, all of which are designated by the Colonists as "grass trees" ... The kangaroo figured in the plate is the Great Red Kangaroo, the (Macropus laniger) of Gould; it is not frequent in South Australia, at least within the limits of the settled districts ...'

The River Murray above Moorundi

The River Murray above Moorundi

Plate 3: The River Murray above Moorundi. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The valley of the Murray is cut through a fossil formation, along which the river sweeps in magnificent reaches from side to side, so the perpendicular cliffs are close to its margins, whilst at other times they slope up at a distance of one or two miles from it, the intervening flats being a rich alluvial deposit covered in reeds. Fine gum trees (Eucalyptus) grow along the banks, forming delightful shady recesses, with the grassy turf beneath them, entirely divested from underwood ... The cliffs represented in the plate, are a yellow fossiliferous sandstone, enclosing layers of gypsum, in which spiral shells occur of the transparency of glass. At Moorundi, is a government station ... and many flourishing Settlers are scattered along the banks of the river.'

Crater of Mount Schank

Crater of Mount Schank

Plate 4: Crater of Mount Schank. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'Mount Schank is one of several extinct volcanoes situated at the South Eastern extremity of the Province of South Australia. In May 1844, I visted this remarkable district in company with His Excellency Governor Grey, and an exploring party. The crater of Mount Schank is a hollow truncated cone, of dark cellular lava; it is about 600 or 700 feet in altitude, and rises almost abruptly from a rich plain, scattered with luxuriant gum and wattle trees; the view from the rim, or outer edge of the crater is peculiarly striking; the neighbouring peaks of Mount Gambier ... rise in the distance on the one side ... whilst on the other, the Mouth of the Glenelg, the high land of Cape Nelson, and indentations of Bridge-water and Discovery Bay, with the Southern Ocean beyond, appear as on a map, over the opposite edge of the crater ... The accompanying sketch was taken in the early morning, and as I started betimes from our camp, I was the first to climb the mountain, stand alone on the edge of that vast crater, and to feel the thrill of pleasure which the grand and sudden panorama awakended. - This is one of the rewards of a traveller's toil'.

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Plate 5: Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants. Comprises 4 vignettes of Aboriginal men in ceremonial dress.

Native weapons and implements

Native weapons and implements

Plate 6: Native weapons and implements. Comprises a number of Aboriginal weapons and implements, all of which are described in detail in the accompanying text.

Port Adelaide

Port Adelaide

Plate 7: Port Adelaide. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The view given of Port Adelaide in the accompanying plate, is taken from the opposite bank of the harbour, looking towards the Mount Lofty Ranges: the red building to the left, is the South Australia Company's Store; fronting it, are their wharfs, and to the right, are those belonging to the Government. The ship moored in the stream, under repair, is the 'Ville de Bordeaux'; she is a French vessel, and was captured by rhe Custom-house officers at the Port for their illicit trading. Outside the bar is a light ship, marking the entrance to the harbour, the approach to which has been admirably buoyed by Captain Lipson ...'

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Plate 5: Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants. Comprises 4 vignettes of Aboriginal women and children: a woman and child of the Adelaide tribe (top left); Tutalla, a girl of the Nauo Tribe (top right); a woman of the Parnkallah tribe, Port Lincoln, with her son (bottom left); a woman of the Adelaide tribe, with her child in a kangaroo skin pouch (bottom right).

Scene on the Coorung near Lake Albert

Scene on the Coorung near Lake Albert

Plate 9: Scene on the Coorung near Lake Albert. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The scene represented on the opposite plate is not far from the extremity of Lake Albert ... the kangaroo figured in the drawing is a new species, inhabiting this location precisely: this elegant little animal is called 'Halmaturus Greyii' in honor of Governor Grey, by whom it was discovered; its distribution is so extremely limited as to extend only for a distance of about fifty miles; it inhabits the scrub adjoining the Coorung to the S.E. of Lake Albert'.

View from Mount Lofty, looking towards the Port, across the Adelaide Plains

View from Mount Lofty, looking towards the Port, across the Adelaide Plains

Plate 10: View from Mount Lofty, looking over the Plains of Adelaide. The Port and St Vincent's Gulf in the distance. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'the eye wanders down a succession of gullies formed by the intersection of the abrupt hills on either side, which are scattered with gum trees, and carpeted with verdant grass: at the bottom of the valley is a serpentine stream, that flows from a waterfall of about sixty feet, down a perpendicular wall of rock below the spot from whence this sketch is taken; beyond lie the Plains of Adelaide in a state of cultivation, and to the right extend those of Parra and Gawler, till they melt away in the extreme distance; nearly opposite the mouth of the gully, the windings of the harbour are seen stretched out as on a map, with the buildings of Port Adelaide just visible when the sun is shining on them; the view is bounded by the waters of Gulf St Vincent, with the opposite shore of Yorkes' Peninsula clearly discernable on the horizon. The time for this sketch is in the month of July (midwinter) when the rains have clothed the hills and vallies of South Australia with a garment of the most brilliant green'.

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Plate 11: Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants. Comprises 4 vignettes of Aboriginal people: 'Wannarillup, a lad of the Wannaloupa tribe, Salt Creek' (top left); 'Lanyerri, a boy of the Milmendura tribe' (top right); 'Rimmilliperingerey, a little boy of the Lower Murray tribe' (bottom left); and 'Yiakate, a youth of the Lake Albert tribe' (bottom right).

Klemzic, a village of German settlers

Klemzic, a village of German settlers

Plate 12: Klemzic. A village of German settlers near Adelaide. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'About three miles from Adelaide is situated the picturesque village of Klemzic, on the banks of the Torrens: it is entirely populated by one of the various bodies of Prussian Emigrants ... their houses and cultivation are in the style of their own country ... Poultry, butter, vegetables, and fruit, are frequently brought into Adelaide for sale by the women, whose picturesque style of dress, and simplicity of manners, obtain for these peasants a considerable share of custom'.

Port Lincoln

Port Lincoln

Plate 13: Port Lincoln, looking across Boston Bay towards Spencers Gulf. Stanford Hill and Thistle Island in the distance. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'This view commands a most extensive scene, looking eastward across Boston Bay, and the entrance of Port Lincoln Proper, towards the Islands at the mouth of Spencers Gulf. The point chosen is from the summit of Winter's Hill, whence the eye wanders over undulating hills, curiously sprinkled with "casurinae" or She oak trees, till it reaches the settlement called Port Lincoln, the houses of which are visible, skirting the margin of the water, where the southern extremity of Boston Bay is bounded by a beach of the whitest sand. Looking directly across the Bay is seen Stanford hill ... Beyond it, to the right, the lofty slopes of Thistle Island are discernable on the horizon; to the left is a portion of Boston Island, which forms a natural breakwater to this magnificent harbour'.

Lynedoch Valley

Lynedoch Valley

Plate 14: Lynedoch Valley, looking towards the Barossa Valley. Features a shepherd with his dog and sheep, overlooking wheatfields which are described in the accompanying text: 'Between twenty and thirty miles from Adelaide, in a N.N.E. direction is situated Lynedoch Valley, a rich agricultural tract of land extending towards the Barossa Range. A considerable portion of land under cultivation is the property of the South Australian Company, producing some of the finest wheat in the world...'

The Kuri dance, the Palti dance

The Kuri dance, the Palti dance

Plate 15: two illustrations: the Kuri dance (top) and the Palti dance (bottom).

Encounter Bay

Encounter Bay

Plate 16: Encounter Bay. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The view ... is taken from the road leading to Mr Strangway's station; looking southwards over Victor Harbour, towards Granite Island, and Wright Island, with the conical bluff of Rosetta Head stretching out to the west'.

Mount Gambier, with one of its volcanic lakes

Mount Gambier, with one of its volcanic lakes

Plate 17: Mount Gambier, with one of its volcanic lakes (after sunset). Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'About nine miles from Mount Schanck ... are the extinct Craters of Mount Gambier, containing several volcanic lakes, enclosed within abrupt walls of lava. The hollows or craters are three in number, that, at the western extremity being the most extensive ... At the end next the lake, cliffs of white coral limestone occur, descending to the water ... in the month of May 1844 ... I visited this singular crater ... between the principal crater and the central one is a terrific wall of lava ... the third and eastenmost, is entirely occupied by a lake of unknown depth, that looks fearfully dark and gloomy when viewed from the heights above; the accompanying sketch is taken looking across the last mentioned lake, towards the principal crater ...'

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Plate 18: Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants. Comprises 4 vignettes of Aboriginal people: 'Milliltie, a man of the Battara tribe, beyond Port Lincoln' (top left); 'Tuarau, an old man of Moorundi, on the river Murray' (top right); 'A man of the Milmendura tribe, wearing the Seaweed Cloak' (bottom left); and 'Poodnobummin, a young man of the Tatta-yarra country' (bottom right).

Kangaroo hunting in the scrub

Kangaroo hunting in the scrub

Plate 19: Kangaroo hunting near Port Lincoln. Albert Peak in the distance. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The subject of the accompanying sketch is a kangaroo hunt in the Scrub in which I took part, near the marble range, about thirty miles westward of Port Lincoln; the hills beyond are called Albert's Range, and the conical summit is known as Albert's Peak'.

Waungerri Lake and the Marble Range

Waungerri Lake and the Marble Range

Plate 20: Waungerri Lake and the Marble Range, westward of Port Lincoln. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'About thirty miles to the North and West of Port Lincoln, there is a rich and beautiful country, as yet but little known, having several fine lakes of water, and luxuriant pasture-land scattered with park-like trees; beyond these lakes rise two distinct ranges of lofty and abrupt hills; the Marble range which is shewn in the opposite plate, and the hills known as Albert's Peak, which lie further to the north. Mount Dutton is represented on the left of the engraving, and Mount Greenly nearly in the centre of the picture'.

Coast scene near Rapid Bay

Coast scene near Rapid Bay

Plate 21: Coast scene near Rapid Bay. Sunset. Natives fishing with nets. Part of the text for the illustration reads 'The accompanying drawing represents the sky at sunset ... during the autumn months. The thunder clouds which had gathered ... became bathed in a radiance of the most intense and exquisite rose colour, which was reflected back upon every object, with a strangely beautiful effect. Such was the scene I have endeavoured to represent, as witnessed from a small cove near Rapid Bay, at the mouth of the Parananakooka rivulet, on the eastern shores of Gulf St Vincent ... for the purpose of fishing [the inhabitants] use a seine about twenty or thirty feet in length, stretched upon sticks placed crosswise at intervals; a couple of men will drag this net amongst the rocks and shallows where fish are most abundant ...'

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Plate 22: Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants. Comprises 4 vignettes of Aboriginal men in ceremonial dress.

Lower falls of Glen Stuart

Lower falls of Glen Stuart

Plate 23: Lower falls of Glen Stuart on the Moriatta Rivulet in the hills near Adelaide. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads '... in Glen Stuart, which is a rocky and romantic pass between the mountains, the beauty of the scenery is enhanced by several waterfalls; the Moriatta rivulet pours its rock-beaten stream through deep hills and over steep chasms of rock, with precipices rising like walls on either side. During its course through Glen Stuart until it reaches the plains, it has three distinct falls, all of which, after rain, are remarkably fine. The lower fall is represented in the annexed plate, where the swollen stream dashes over a precipice of some seventy feet, descending into a deep pool, from whence if again flows along on its downward mission to the plains. The borders of this stream are in many places choked with the fresh-water tea-tree; the native lilac, and a dwarf species of mimosa are frequent along its banks; a variety of Xantharaea, styled "black-boy" by the settlers, overruns the rocky sides of these hills, usually abounding in the most stony and inaccessible places'.

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants

Plate 24: Portraits of the Aboriginal inhabitants. Comprises 4 vignettes of Aboriginal men in ceremonial dress.

The River Murray, near Lake Alexandrina

The River Murray, near Lake Alexandrina

Plate 25: The River Murray, near Lake Alexandrina. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads '... the subject of the annexed plate is taken from the limestone cliffs that border upon the left bank of the river, about halfway between the crossing place at Wirrum, and the junction of the Murray with the Lake. A fine view of the river is obtained from this high ground, from whence the eye may trace its course, winding in a succession of the most graceful sweeps, between vast flats of reeds ... The hills rising from this valley, or basin of the Murray, are clothed with belts of pine; and beyond is an extensive country of scrub. A few scattered gum trees grow along the margin of the river ...'

Old gum tree on the Gawler

Old gum tree on the Gawler

Plate 26: Old gum tree on the Gawler. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The ... plate represents the trunk of an aged gum-tree or 'eucalyptus', on the banks of one of the water holes of the river Gawler: the marks in the bark are incisions or cuts made by the natives with their climbing sticks ... The locality of this subject is on the Gawler at Salem Valley, about two miles from German Pass ... at the season when this view was taken (the month of February) the grass around was parched in many places, and the course of the river marked only by a succession of deep water-holes ...'

The Aboriginal inhabitants. Ornaments and utensils

The Aboriginal inhabitants. Ornaments and utensils

Plate 27: The Aboriginal inhabitants. Ornaments and utensils.

Angaston. Evening

Angaston. Evening

Plate 28: Angaston. Evening. Part of the text accompanying the illustration reads 'The township of Angaston, at German Pass, is picturesquely situated at the head of a rocky glen, looking towards Greenock Hills, over which the setting sun throws a purple radiance, as it sinks behind their wooded summits. The few houses which at present form the nucleus of a future town occupy a grassy flat between steep rounded hills, which are scattered here and there with park-like trees of the 'eucalyptus' family ... the lowing cattle are returning homewards: there is an air of peace and independence about the scene, with the little chapel on the hill, and the wreaths of smoke gently curling up from the cottages beneath the gum trees ...'

The Gorge at Yankallillah, and Arthur's Station

The Gorge at Yankallillah, and Arthur's Station

Plate 29: Two illustrations: The GORGE AT YANKALLILLAH 'not far from the beautiful and picturesque residence of Mr Kemmis, surrounded by the rich valleys of Yankallillah ... the hills descend abruptly to the plains and are intersected by deep ravines and gullies ... the position chosen for the accompanying view is looking South West towards the entrance to the Gorge; to the right, the hills descend to the sea shore, forming perpendicular cliffs towards Rapid Bay...'; and ARTHUR'S STATION, with one of the volcanic wells: Mount Schank in the distance. Early morning. 'About three hundred and sixty miles to the S.S.E. of Adelaide ... a marine formation exists, evidently raised from beneath the sea by volcanic action: in many places coral limestone appears on the surface, and circular cavities, like vast wells, occur here and there .. containing lakes of pure fresh water ... The tree to the right is a 'banksia' ... the huts are built of coral limestone and thatched with sheets of bark; and water is raised by means of a pulley from the never-failing reservoir below'.